We who preach the gospel must not think of ourselves as public relations agents sent to establish good will between Christ and the world. We must not imagine ourselves commissioned to make Christ acceptable to big business, the press, the world of sports or modern education. We are not diplomats but prophets, and our message is not a compromise but an ultimatum. A.W. Tozer
Therefore let God-inspired Scripture decide between us; and on whichever side be found doctrines in harmony with the word of God, in favor of that side will be cast the vote of truth. --Basil of Caesarea
Once you learn to discern, there's no going back. You will begin to spot the lie everywhere it appears.

I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, because He considered me faithful, putting me into service. 1 Timothy 1:12

Tuesday, July 28, 2015

Where Is the Sense of the Sacred?

Evangelical Protestantism is in trouble today as an increasing number of business and professional people are searching for a new church.  The complaint I hear most often is that people can no longer sense the sacred either in the preaching or in the liturgy. … Worship has become performance rather than praise.  The praise choruses that have preempted the great hymns of the church do not hide the fact that our worship is essentially a spectacle that appeals to the senses rather than an act of obeisance to the mighty God who is both holiness and love.  Contemporary worship is far more egocentric than theocentric.  The aim is less to give glory to God than to satisfy the longings of the human heart.  Even when we sing God’s praises, the focus is on fulfilling and satisfying the human desire for wholeness and serenity.

Donald G. Bloesch, “Whatever Happened to God?,” Christianity Today, Feb. 5, 2001, pg.54.  Cited by Gary E. Gilley and M. Kurt Goedelman, “I’d Like to Teach the Church to Sing,” Personal Freedom Outreach’s The Quarterly Journal, July-September 2015 (Vol.35, No.3), pg.11

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