We who preach the gospel must not think of ourselves as public relations agents sent to establish good will between Christ and the world. We must not imagine ourselves commissioned to make Christ acceptable to big business, the press, the world of sports or modern education. We are not diplomats but prophets, and our message is not a compromise but an ultimatum. A.W. Tozer
Therefore let God-inspired Scripture decide between us; and on whichever side be found doctrines in harmony with the word of God, in favor of that side will be cast the vote of truth. --Basil of Caesarea
Once you learn to discern, there's no going back. You will begin to spot the lie everywhere it appears.

I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, because He considered me faithful, putting me into service. 1 Timothy 1:12

Thursday, October 25, 2018

"This is my body"


When we insist on a literal meaning to this statement, “This is my body,” difficulties are created. Our Lord was physically present with His disciples when He took in His hand a piece of bread and said [“This is my body”]. He did not say, “This has or will become my body,” but “This is my body.” How cold something He held in His hand be a part of His body? How could the contents of the cup be literally His blood, when as yet He had not shed it? The metaphor, however, was just as natural then as when He said on other occasions, “I am the door,” or “I am…the bright and morning star” (Rev.22:16). If we were able to take the latter of these expressions, and apply it literally, we would be worshipping the planet Venus or, mystically, the presence of Jesus in the planet. However, taking the words as a metaphor, they suggest the simple New Testament truth of the Lord’s return for the church.

Neil M. Fraser, The Lord’s Supper, (An Emmaus Bible College Correspondence Course), pg.24

10 comments:

Randy Littmann said...

It is also interesting to note the context in which Jesus made this statement. He was holding the 'afikomen' (passover matzah bread) and the third of four cups of wine for the Passover Seder. Jesus never mentioned a statement like this about any other bread or wine although it can be very certain He had eaten them previously. There is something significant in the Last Supper 'afikomen' ceremony that I will let the readers of this comment discover for themselves.

Glenn E. Chatfield said...

Randy,
Anyone who has attended a Jews for Jesus teaching on the Passover has learned about that. Also in the book, "Christ in the Passover."

Anonymous said...

Hi Glenn,

Yes, metaphors. Similes. Symbols. Etc. God uses a few of those in Scripture from time to time, doesn't He? ;-)

John 6, vs 63, Jesus said what He was referring to (vs 52-56) was a spiritual concept. Also, basic biology 101, Jesus also said what we eat does not go through the heart, but rather passes through the stomach and is eliminated (Mark 7:18-19).

And yes, we read Christ in the Passover and attended an instructive seder. Understand the afikomen. :)

-Carolyn

Jesse said...

Carolyn,

This article gives a powerful blow to Eucharist theology:

https://rationalchristiandiscernment.blogspot.com/2018/02/is-roman-catholic-eucharist-logical.html

Glenn E. Chatfield said...

Jesse,

I also did a pretty thorough examination of the Catholic Eucharist:
https://watchmansbagpipes.blogspot.com/2010/06/catholic-eucharist-unbiblical-and.html

The quote on this post is only a thought-provoker and not intended as a deep study.

Jesse said...

Oh, my apologies. I was not intending to imply anything negative by my first comment.

Glenn E. Chatfield said...

I didn't take it that way.

Anonymous said...

Jesse,

Thank you. Glenn, likewise. Both have plenty of good information to repudiate the eucharist.

-Carolyn

Anonymous said...

Is repudiate the right word? You know what I'm saying. To prove eucharist is wrong.

Bad grammar day, maybe.

-Carolyn

Glenn E. Chatfield said...

Carolyn,

"Repudiate" is just fine; it means to deny the truth of whatever.