We who preach the gospel must not think of ourselves as public relations agents sent to establish good will between Christ and the world. We must not imagine ourselves commissioned to make Christ acceptable to big business, the press, the world of sports or modern education. We are not diplomats but prophets, and our message is not a compromise but an ultimatum. A.W. Tozer

Thursday, March 13, 2008

Robert Schuller - Heretic

I've been quite busy with a project for work and haven't had an opportunity to do much apologetics lately, meaning no blog work.

This week I read the latest issue of Think On These Things, the monthly apologetics letter from Southern View Chapel, Springfield, IL. Featured this month was Robert Schuller, a first-class heretic who has one of the largest congregations (of course) and sells lots of his books in every so-called "Christian" book store in the nation. I've read lots about, and by, Robert Schuller over the years and he gets his followers only because he makes them feel good.

Rather than do a real thorough expose on Schuller, which could be quite time-consuming, I'm just going to give you a taste of his teachings from the TOTT article. If you need more evidence as to Schuller's heresy, feel free to e-mail me with that request. That said, here's Mr. Schuller's words:

"Sin is any act or thought that robs myself or another human being of his or her self-esteem." Gee, and I thought sin was rebellion against God and violating His commands.

"A person is in hell when he has lost his self-esteem." Seriously -this is Schuller's definition of hell! Has he read the New Testament at all?

"As we focus on Jesus Christ, we shall discover a new theology, one that offers salvation from shame to self-esteem." Oh, and the gospel we are to proclaim is to "tell people everywhere that God wants all of us to feel good about ourselves!" Can someone show me any of this from Scripture?

To be born again "means that we must be changed from a negative to a positive self-image - from inferiority to self-esteem, from fear to love, from doubt to trust." Hmmmmmm.

We must have a "new reformation" according to Schuller: "It is precisely at this point that classical theology has erred in its insistence that theology be 'God-centered,' not 'man-centered.'" And here I thought theology, by definition, was the study of God! I always thought our Christian - and even Jewish - faith was centered on God, but I guess I've been wrong all this time. So do we worship man now?

Schuller has called a Muslim Grand Mufti "truly one of the great Christ-honoring leaders of faith." This leads me to wonder if Schuller knows anything at all about Islam, let alone Christianity.

Finally, according to Schuller those in the kingdom of God are "Everyone who does some act that builds self-esteem and self-respect in other persons."

I could go on and on from my many reference sources, but I think you get the point: Robert Schuller has no clue what the Christian faith is really about. If he truly believes what he teaches, then I can't see where he is a true Christian either. But hundreds of thousands, if not millions, follow him ardently because he makes them feel good.

Schuller's mentor was Norman Vincent Peale, who taught a lot of the same self-esteem gospel. Schuller is also the root of the whole market-driven, seeker-sensitive philosophies, and is a mentor of Rick Warren and many others in those churches. So why do we not hear him warned against by our local church leaders? I've gone into too many homes of friends and have seen Schuller's books on their coffee tables and book shelves. I usually do not fail to give them a gentle warning about him, but what about all those we share the pews with who have no such warnings?

Robert Schuller - another of those who will be told by Christ, "I never knew you."

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

Did you ever turn on a preacher and get a "greasy" feeling before they'd even said anything? I will say I let Shuller soil my ears for a few minutes before changing the channel. In that short period of time I heard him babble nonsense long enough that I've never bothered to listen to him again. I must give the Holy Spirit credit for the "greasy" feeling though. That seems to be one of the ways He warns me.

Michael Burdick