We who preach the gospel must not think of ourselves as public relations agents sent to establish good will between Christ and the world. We must not imagine ourselves commissioned to make Christ acceptable to big business, the press, the world of sports or modern education. We are not diplomats but prophets, and our message is not a compromise but an ultimatum. A.W. Tozer

Monday, June 6, 2011

Random Apostasies and Heresies

One of the more bizarre instances of “religion” recently was the story about a lady who won a $1 million lottery after her son prayed for her to win.  Now this supposed atheist has come back to the fold of the Catholic church.  Maybe I’m just a wee bit cynical here, but I find it difficult to believe that God would answer this prayer for a woman to benefit from gambling.  I also find it difficult that God would answer this prayer so as to lead a man into the cultic Roman Catholic religion.  I am much more inclined to believe we have a bonafide coincidence!
I learned a bit more about The Message non-Bible this week.  Apparently the “god” of Eugene Peterson is an environmental god, because Romans 15:13 says, “Oh! May the God of green hope fill you up with joy...”   The “Mess” also omits the sin of homosexuality from various passages.  A while back I purchased an NIV/The Message parallel Bible so as to do some studies of comparison for exposing this “Mess” for what it is, but I just haven’t had the time to do so.  I still intend to get to it when possible.  This book, after all, is a favorite of false teacher Rick Warren, as he uses it to propagate his false teachings.
If you’ve never been over to The Museum of Idolatry, I highly recommend it as a place to see the idolatrous trends of the church.  This past week they had an excellent example of the entertainment-orientation of so many churches.  Too many assemblies don’t want to teach from Scripture because it isn’t entertaining enough, so they play-act at being at the movies, etc.  And we wonder why our young people especially have no theological understanding of their faith.
Lastly for today, more apostasy from members of the United Methodist Church.  [link dead by 5/3/14] At an annual conference, “about 40 members of Minnesota’s United Methodist clergy signed a statement saying they would marry any couple who came to them, including two women or two men.”   Why is it people want to play at being Christian while denying what God has specifically taught?  Why don’t they call themselves something else rather than blemishing the name of Christ?  Well, Bishop Sally Dyck (female bishop in the UMC is part of their problem) says that the statement doesn’t break church rules, but doesn’t it break the rules the Bible lays down for elders?  I will look forward to the dismissal of all these “clergy” - but I know it will never happen.

3 comments:

Marshall Art said...

Hi Glen! My first time visiting here, though I've been meaning to for some time after reading your comments at Neil's and elsewhere.

I do want to inquire about your comment in the first piece. Why do you think God wouldn't answer a prayer for anyone to benefit from gambling? What's wrong with gambling? I don't mean what's wrong with how people abuse gambling and can be corrupted by it, but gambling itself. I love gambling and would do it more if I had a better income and more time. It's a form of entertainment that can also enrich one's life if done properly. I've asked others now and then to cite something from Scripture that would justify a negative attitude for the gaming of this kind, and have come up dry, as I have when studying myself. Bear in mind, I do not equate gambling with greed, though the greedy hope to get wealthy via gambling. But that doesn't mean gambling itself is bad/evil/wicked/wrong.

And if God chose to benefit anyone, what makes you believe that he would not use gambling to do so? I buy lottery tickets regularly. I don't ask Him to make the little balls fall my way. I figure if He wants me to enjoy immediate wealth, He will. I leave it up to Him. But I don't buy if I don't have the money. The money could always be used for other things, but so could money spent on dinner and a movie, or new clothes not needed or a billion other things for which people trade their cash without thoughts of whether or not it is wicked, good or neither to do so.

As to leading anyone to the RCC, you do realize that it could lead people toward a more sound understanding of the faith to get a taste of it from a "lesser" denomination, don't you? God works in mysterious ways, and my own Catholic upbringing kept me in His fold long enough to study for myself and turn toward the Bible until I found problems that led me away from the RCC. Going from nothing to even the RCC is better than staying at the nothing. Who knows where it could lead the man?

I'm just sayin'.

Glenn E. Chatfield said...

Hi Marshall,

Welcome to my blog! Of course this is only the apologetics side - you have to link to my other one to see my social commentary side :oD

As for the issue of Gambling, how about I answer your questions with a new post on that very issue? I can do it fairly quickly by cutting and pasting from an outline of an old class I taught to high school Sunday School.

As for the RCC: No, I do not believe God would lead anyone to the RCC any more than He would to the LDS. No where in Scripture will you find God leading people false teachings where they can be trapped, just so they can sample what false teachings are like. Of course I believe God can use people's experience in false teachings, as He has done with my stint as a Mormon, but I don't see God's character as leading people into lies and heresy.

Glenn E. Chatfield said...

One commenter, whose name linked to a heretical site (he calls himself a "non-trinitarin Christian"), had this to say:

"I'm skeptical about the lottery thing, too. Considering that a lot of people pray to win the lottery, it was bound to happen that someone who prayed/was prayed for won. Probabilities, man."

I have to agree with that statement!